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Thread: Savage vs. Browning X-Bolt Accuracy Comparison. Your Opinion.

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    Registered User Roger SS's Avatar
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    Savage vs. Browning X-Bolt Accuracy Comparison. Your Opinion.

    Just want to see what you think. Savage is known for their accuracy. Alot of hunters use Browning though. Curious of your thoughts/experiences/opinions on the comparison.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger SS View Post
    Just want to see what you think. Savage is known for their accuracy. Alot of hunters use Browning though. Curious of your thoughts/experiences/opinions on the comparison.
    You kind of answered your own question.

    Hunters aren't trying to put 5 rounds through the same hole @ 100-200 yards.

    They are happy with an inch to 2 inches.

  3. #3
    Both are fine shooters. I don't own an x-bolt but I have helped a friend mount scopes and sight in 2 of them.
    It has a factory bedding job and a pretty decent trigger out of the box. Both of them shot around 2" groups at 100yds with Leupold VX-1 scopes and factory ammo. With some ammo testing or load development if you reload, I have no doubt that they can be a MOA gun. Problem is, if you wanted to do any tinkering with it, it woud be a gunsmith job. I think the Savages hold more accuracy potential for the do-it-yourselfer because of the ability to work on them yourself. In the end, this question always comes down to personal preference. If it were me buying a hunting gun, I'd get a Savage Weather Warrior and call it a day with an extra $200 in my pocket to put toward a scope. But then again... back to personal preference.

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    Registered User Roger SS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRIAN G View Post
    Both are fine shooters. I don't own an x-bolt but I have helped a friend mount scopes and sight in 2 of them.
    It has a factory bedding job and a pretty decent trigger out of the box. Both of them shot around 2" groups at 100yds with Leupold VX-1 scopes and factory ammo. With some ammo testing or load development if you reload, I have no doubt that they can be a MOA gun. Problem is, if you wanted to do any tinkering with it, it woud be a gunsmith job. I think the Savages hold more accuracy potential for the do-it-yourselfer because of the ability to work on them yourself. In the end, this question always comes down to personal preference. If it were me buying a hunting gun, I'd get a Savage Weather Warrior and call it a day with an extra $200 in my pocket to put toward a scope. But then again... back to personal preference.
    Good info. The X-Bolt has the 26'' barrel and the Weather Warrior has the 24'' barrel and weighs 4 oz. more. I think for long range hunting. That 2'' may make quite a difference.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger SS View Post
    Good info. The X-Bolt has the 26'' barrel and the Weather Warrior has the 24'' barrel and weighs 4 oz. more. I think for long range hunting. That 2'' may make quite a difference.
    Depends, how far are you shooting?

    Don't get accuracy and velocity mixed up.

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    The Savage is definitely going to be more accurate, but the X bolt is a lot nicer imo smoother bolt and much better looking. Savage definitely has an advantage with aftermarket support, though.

    I don't think the 2" barrel advantage is as great as you think it is.
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  7. #7
    And if you want a different length it's much easier to change a barrel on the Savage than on the Browning.

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    Registered User 1ShotKing's Avatar
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    The 2" in barrel length does not provide enough of an advantage to overcome the accuracy difference between the two rifles. For arguments sake let's say the Savage out of the box shoots 1 MOA, so we're talking about a 1" group at 100 yards. Theoretically (yes theoretically is just that, theory) the same rifle will shoot approximately an 8" group at 800 yards. Now lets say the Browning shoots 1.5 MOA, so at 100 yards roughly a 1.5" group. At 800 yards that same gun will again theoretically remain a 1.5 MOA gun and shoot a group around 12 inches. This may or may not make a difference for your intended use, as long as you bear in mind the further out you shoot the bigger the difference becomes and the harder it will be to remain consistent.

    I have shot both rifles, although not nearly as much rounds through the X-Bolt. The Feather Trigger is nice in that it has a very short travel and it is crisp. I do think however the accu-trigger is nicer overall. There's not much warning with the X-Bolt at least with the accu-trigger you know when the first blade is in all the way and it's about ready to break. The X-Bolt is smooth but I don't think it's smooth enough to let that be a deciding factor over the Savage. If you want a smooth factory bolt gun, look at a TC or a Tikka.

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    Registered User Roger SS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by efm77 View Post
    And if you want a different length it's much easier to change a barrel on the Savage than on the Browning.
    Interesting point. Would it be appropiate (in terms of balance, fit, etc) to rebarrel a rifle that HAD a 22'' barrel with a 26'' barrel?
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    Registered User Roger SS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1ShotKing View Post
    The 2" in barrel length does not provide enough of an advantage to overcome the accuracy difference between the two rifles. For arguments sake let's say the Savage out of the box shoots 1 MOA, so we're talking about a 1" group at 100 yards. Theoretically (yes theoretically is just that, theory) the same rifle will shoot approximately an 8" group at 800 yards. Now lets say the Browning shoots 1.5 MOA, so at 100 yards roughly a 1.5" group. At 800 yards that same gun will again theoretically remain a 1.5 MOA gun and shoot a group around 12 inches. This may or may not make a difference for your intended use, as long as you bear in mind the further out you shoot the bigger the difference becomes and the harder it will be to remain consistent.

    I have shot both rifles, although not nearly as much rounds through the X-Bolt. The Feather Trigger is nice in that it has a very short travel and it is crisp. I do think however the accu-trigger is nicer overall. There's not much warning with the X-Bolt at least with the accu-trigger you know when the first blade is in all the way and it's about ready to break. The X-Bolt is smooth but I don't think it's smooth enough to let that be a deciding factor over the Savage. If you want a smooth factory bolt gun, look at a TC or a Tikka.

    1ShotKing
    Nicely illustrated points. Thanks 1ShotKing. TC...let's see Thompson/Center Arms. ok That X-Bolt is smooth and a good looker. Especially the Stainless Stalker. Hmmmm, decisions, decisions.
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    Registered User Roger SS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rusty815 View Post
    The Savage is definitely going to be more accurate, but the X bolt is a lot nicer imo smoother bolt and much better looking. Savage definitely has an advantage with aftermarket support, though.

    I don't think the 2" barrel advantage is as great as you think it is.
    Thanks Rusty. What is it that makes the Savage so accurate?
    X-Bolt uses glass bedding...high quality button barrel... In other words, what does Savage do to their rifles that makes them more accurate compared to other quality production rifles?
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  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger SS View Post
    Thanks Rusty. What is it that makes the Savage so accurate?
    X-Bolt uses glass bedding...high quality button barrel... In other words, what does Savage do to their rifles that makes them more accurate compared to other quality production rifles?
    The accuracy is engineered into the Savage with the floating bolt head. Other items such as the barrel nut which allows very accurate headspacing, pillar bedding, and a good trigger don't hurt either.

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    Registered User Roger SS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kkeene View Post
    The accuracy is engineered into the Savage with the floating bolt head. Other items such as the barrel nut which allows very accurate headspacing, pillar bedding, and a good trigger don't hurt either.
    Oh yeah...floating bolt head, headspacing with barrel nut. Thanks for reminding me, I'm not trying to be a Savage turncoat of course...just trying to be realistic as I want to do long range hunting but knowing my Model 111 LRH 7 Mag weighs 8.8 lbs. rifle only might be a limiting factor. Hiking, walking carrying it all day, etc... X-Bolt= 6.13 lbs. rifle only.
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    Registered User 1ShotKing's Avatar
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    Check out the Kimber Mountain Ascent. The rifle itself weighs just 5lbs and 5 ounces. It has a 24" barrel and you can get it in the wonderful long range caliber, 280 AI. The 280 in the improved version (AI - Ackley Improved) gives performance near the 7mm Rem. Mag. I have never seen let alone touched a Kimber but if light weight is your thing it's worth a look.

    Not trying to rain on your parade either but bear in mind long range hunting requires some extra weight other than the rifle. I know I would definitely want to have a method of steadying the rifle, whether it be a bipod, shooting sticks, the choice is yours but that's something else most would need to tote around. Also you'll want a scope suitable for long range hunting and normally that involves a scope that is physically bigger than a typical hunting scope and with that comes more weight as well. I guess the short version of what I'm trying to say is you need to look at the whole system not just the rifle as a stand alone unit.

    1ShotKing

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    Registered User Roger SS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1ShotKing View Post
    Check out the Kimber Mountain Ascent. The rifle itself weighs just 5lbs and 5 ounces. It has a 24" barrel and you can get it in the wonderful long range caliber, 280 AI. The 280 in the improved version (AI - Ackley Improved) gives performance near the 7mm Rem. Mag. I have never seen let alone touched a Kimber but if light weight is your thing it's worth a look.

    Not trying to rain on your parade either but bear in mind long range hunting requires some extra weight other than the rifle. I know I would definitely want to have a method of steadying the rifle, whether it be a bipod, shooting sticks, the choice is yours but that's something else most would need to tote around. Also you'll want a scope suitable for long range hunting and normally that involves a scope that is physically bigger than a typical hunting scope and with that comes more weight as well. I guess the short version of what I'm trying to say is you need to look at the whole system not just the rifle as a stand alone unit.

    1ShotKing
    More great advice indeed which is much appreciated. This Model 111 LRH is like a small piece of field artillery. lol Just the rifle bare. I think I'll probably go the shooting sticks route. Right now, got a Vortex Viper 6.5-20x44 and a Redfield Revenge 6-18x44 and a Nikon Prostaff 4-12x40 So nothing to huge and heavy (or perhaps even appropriate for 700 yards) I also plan on going back to gym to get fit. That might help the most! lol
    Last edited by Roger SS; 01-08-2013 at 08:03 PM.
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