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Thread: 308 vs 7mm-08 vs 260

  1. #1

    308 vs 7mm-08 vs 260

    I know they are all in the same family.

    Looking for an all purpose New England hunting round. Maybe a trip out west or up north to Quebec....

    I have a 308 now, and am looking at the 7mm and 260 as flatter shooting, less recoil options...

    Thanks in advance, ad

  2. #2
    Registered User big honkin jeep's Avatar
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    I've never played with the .260 but can tell you that you wont notice a real world hill of beans worth of difference between the .308 and the 7-08 except when you go to buy ammo. I got out of the 7-08s a while back just for this very reason. .308 is much easier to find and typically much cheaper too. At most practical hunting ranges the trajectory is close enough to be negligible on a shot to the vitals and the recoil is indistinguishable to my shoulder.
    In my opinion not enough difference to justify the hassle unless you just want one.
    A good woman and a steady job has ruined many a great hunter.

  3. #3
    The .260 is a lot flatter shooting and the 120 gr bullets will do as well as the 150 gr .308 bullets.

    Hence the recoil is lighter and you can take about the same class of game except possibly the very heaviest.

    The 6.5 caliber in cartridges equivalent to the .260 have taken every type of game on the planet, but black bear and moose may be as heavy as one should go, even with the .308 Winchester.

  4. #4
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    As jeep as already stated, there isn't much difference between the 7-08 and 308 except for the price of ammo. The 260 will be tough to find ammo for; select this one if you plan to reload. 7-08 is a little easier to find, however, the 308 is one of the most prevalent choices out there. When going through these small towns and you need ammo, you will find 308 on the shelves. 7-08 maybe.
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  5. #5
    Paid Member stomp442's Avatar
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    The 260 retains much more energy at ranges past 500 yards than the 308 and will buck the wind twice as good. The 260 is an outstanding cartridge for north American game.

  6. #6
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    Right now there is a 7mm-08 takeoff barrel on the forum for $50.

    If you reload, ammo price and availability generally is not (or at least, less of) a factor.

    Obviously, given the same weight, a .284" projectile will have a greater SD and BC than a .308" projectile, and a .264" projectile will have a greater SD and BC than a .284 projectile.

    Good luck and let us know what you decide!
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  7. #7
    By any of my ballistic calculations the 7-08 is a bit flatter then the 260 and has more energy to 600 yards if using 120 or 140 grain bullets, but they are very close to each other and the 308. Any of the three cartridges are a good choice.

  8. #8
    is the recoil significantly different between a 7mm and 260?

  9. #9
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    I shoot the 7mm-08 and the recoil depends on the load, but mostly at least to me its less than the .308.
    I have no problem popping steel at 700 yds with it using a 120g NBT or the 140g NHBT bullets.
    100yds runs from .530" to .980" with my handloads also.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Atracksler View Post
    is the recoil significantly different between a 7mm and 260?
    if using the same powder charge and same bullet weight,the .260 rem will actually have a small increase in recoil over the 7-08 because of the smaller bore size.

  11. #11
    Im in the same boat, I want a light weight hunting rifle and I already have a 308fv but its too heavy to walk with. I like what I found about the 260. I also reload so thats not a problem. But I do have brass and die's for the 308 already. Also it is very easy to find 308 ammo. Not that Im stocking up for the end of the world, but you can always get 308 ammo...If I get a good deal on a used savage in 308 will probley get a new stock for it and call it a day. In another caliber, I might go with the 260.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Savage22-250 View Post
    By any of my ballistic calculations the 7-08 is a bit flatter then the 260 and has more energy to 600 yards if using 120 or 140 grain bullets, but they are very close to each other and the 308. Any of the three cartridges are a good choice.
    In these days of laser range-finders, the wind drift is the critical parameter for reliably hitting a target.

    Compare the drift at 10 mph, and you will find that the .260 waxes both the 7mm-08 and the .308 at ranges past 500 yards.

  13. #13
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    I've bought a couple of Remington Model 7's in .308 and .260. And I've tried to build several LW Savage rifle in .260. That was before the Savage introduced the model 11 LW Hunter. I could never get sub MOA accuracy with the Remington's and sold them. The recoil from a .308 in a LW rifle is punishing at the bench during load work up. Below is the ballistic chart for my 260 hunting load with H4350, Lapua brass and 130 gr Berger VLD's from a Savage 11 LW Hunter with 20" FW barrel. Accuracy is 0.65 MOA. Recoil is a lot more managable which results in better accuracy with a LW rifle. Down range performance is better than a .308. The SD of a .264 130 gr bullet is the same as heavier .308 bullets. I cannot find anything not to like about the 6.5mm calibers if your reload and remember to take you're ammo with you.

    260 Remington 130 gr Berger VLD G7 BC = 0.282
    Bullet Wind Bullet
    Yrds Path 10 MPH Velocity Energy
    0 -1.50 2913 2450
    50 0.20 0.10 2828 2717
    100 0.00 0.50 2744 2174
    150 -0.90 1.30 2662 2046
    200 -3.10 2.30 2581 1923
    250 -6.60 3.60 2501 1806
    300 -11.40 5.20 2423 1695
    350 -17.70 7.30 2346 1589
    400 -25.60 9.60 2270 1488
    450 -35.20 12.40 2196 1392
    500 -46.50 16.50 2137 1319
    550 -69.70 19.10 2052 1216
    600 -75.00 23.20 1983 1135

    Recoil
    Rifle Wt. Energy
    7.0 lbs 15.4 ft-lbs
    Last edited by jpdown; 08-15-2012 at 11:05 AM.

  14. #14
    I thoight recoil would be a problem with the 308. If I do a 260 I was thinking 22 or 24inch heavy sporter barrel...
    Quote Originally Posted by jpdown View Post
    I've bought a couple of Remington Model 7's in .308 and .260. And I've tried to build several LW Savage rifle in .260. That was before the Savage introduced the model 11 LW Hunter. I could never get sub MOA accuracy with the Remington's and sold them. The recoil from a .308 in a LW rifle is punishing at the bench during load work up. Below is the ballistic chart for my 260 hunting load with H4350, Lapua brass and 130 gr Berger VLD's from a Savage 11 LW Hunter with 20" FW barrel. Accuracy is 0.65 MOA. Recoil is a lot more managable which results in better accuracy with a LW rifle. Down range performance is better than a .308. The SD of a .264 130 gr bullet is the same as heavier .308 bullets. I cannot find anything not to like about the 6.5mm calibers if your reload and remember to take you're ammo with you.

    260 Remington 130 gr Berger VLD G7 BC = 0.282
    Bullet Wind Bullet
    Yrds Path 10 MPH Velocity Energy
    0 -1.50 2913 2450
    50 0.20 0.10 2828 2717
    100 0.00 0.50 2744 2174
    150 -0.90 1.30 2662 2046
    200 -3.10 2.30 2581 1923
    250 -6.60 3.60 2501 1806
    300 -11.40 5.20 2423 1695
    350 -17.70 7.30 2346 1589
    400 -25.60 9.60 2270 1488
    450 -35.20 12.40 2196 1392
    500 -46.50 16.50 2137 1319
    550 -69.70 19.10 2052 1216
    600 -75.00 23.20 1983 1135

    Recoil
    Rifle Wt. Energy
    7.0 lbs 15.4 ft-lbs

  15. #15
    Registered User big honkin jeep's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 12fv 308 View Post
    I thoight recoil would be a problem with the 308. If I do a 260 I was thinking 22 or 24inch heavy sporter barrel...
    There's a solution for that even in a super lightweight shorty. Note the brake in the pic. The newer brakes are also much better at directing muzzle blast and noise away from the shooter than those of past decades. This one is in .308 with a 16"barrel. The recoil is amazingly light and by using a used donor .243 and some takeoff parts (stock ,mag, sporter barrel) bought here from the classifieds, I'm in it for much less than a new model 10 from a big box store. I haven't chronyd a load through it yet but am quite certain that it has plenty of energy and velocity to get the job done. The accuracy is there for sure as confirmed by my last trip to the range. After all the strikers are doing it way out there with even less barrel. My thinking on this build was to select a mainstream cartridge and build the rifle for the performance I wanted rather than picking a cartridge that may compromise on cost, bullet selection or availability. I have found that all the extra barrel length, weight etc is OK for bench shooting but in the real world doesn't seem to make that much difference in accuracy or velocity to a point. A quarter of an inch accuracy at 100yds or a half inch at 200 yards isn't worth me hauling a heavy long bulky rifle all over the countryside, though it can make the difference in a match. Over the years I've come to the realization that for things that need killing, an accurate compact,light handy rig is the way to go. If you wanna impress the other guy with oddball calibers and 12# of unnecessary steel then go ahead. Most pro guides from coast to coast know the guy that shows up with a 20"-22" 30-06 (or other .30 cal) topped by a Vari X3 is serious and properly equipped. Just a couple of more things to think about if selecting a hunting rig.
    A good woman and a steady job has ruined many a great hunter.

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