Thanks Thanks:  1
Likes Likes:  2
Dislikes Dislikes:  0
Results 1 to 21 of 21

Thread: Looking for accuracy advice

  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    12

    Looking for accuracy advice

    Gentlemen,

    I just got a Axis in 7mm-08 recently, got a hand load I am happy with from the bench at 100 yards. About 1.70 inch groups. This is a hunting rifle, so I am doing a lot of shooting from a sitting and standing position as you would while hunting. Shooting out at 100 yards at clay pigeons, a 4x scope and a sling.

    Sitting position is fairly solid, but from standing not so good. I would say like one out of eight will hit the target. I sure would like to improve that a little.

    Anyone have any advice for improving off-hand shooting?

    Thanks!

    Herb

  2. #2
    Basic Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    las cruces, nm
    Posts
    215
    Standing is not an easy position to master. I never did. Basics. Good position. Good trigger work./

  3. #3
    Basic Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Tacoma, WA
    Age
    48
    Posts
    298
    A good shooting sling can help. Supporting the weight of the rifle on your bodies structure is the important part in holding still. You are going to wobble or have the lazy 8 thing going on. You just need to relax and try to keep the wobble as small as possible.

  4. #4
    Basic Member Nub Hippie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    N.Y.
    Age
    30
    Posts
    99
    Sadly there is no umbrella answer, the muscles required to hold a rifle in a standing position are not often exercised in common day to day activities so the more you hold your rifle in position the stronger said muscles will become resulting in a more steady hold. It would also be beneficial to use a proper cuff style shooting sling such as a M1907 or a web sling. If you get a web sling I highly recommend cotton over the new nylon models as they are more comfortable and will not slip once adjusted and if buying a 1907 just pay for a good one to begin with such as one by Turner saddlery or a Ron Brown sold by Creedmoor. There are also lots of newer versions of these slings, those are just the ones adopted by the military throughout the years. However a sling isn't really going to help with fast shots in hunting situations unless you spend lots of time practicing getting into the sling and most prefer what they call a hasty sling position which can be achieved with any adjustable sling and is just a modified cuff sling position that's faster to assume, it'll help steady you and is very fast to get into.
    Rusty Shackelford

  5. #5
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    12
    Thanks for the advice. Yesterday I tightened up the sling a little and brought my supporting elbow way back against my side. Pretty much just held my palm flat up and rested the rifle on it. Pretty solid. Can hit a 4 inch target at 100 yards often enough to build some confidence.... but good to keep in mind a nice spring day at the gun club shooting little clay targets is a lot different than a cold drizzle in October, you are in the brush your feet are soaked and your target is running.

  6. #6
    Basic Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Central Arizona
    Posts
    122
    Quote Originally Posted by Herby View Post
    Thanks for the advice. Yesterday I tightened up the sling a little and brought my supporting elbow way back against my side. Pretty much just held my palm flat up and rested the rifle on it. Pretty solid. Can hit a 4 inch target at 100 yards often enough to build some confidence.... but good to keep in mind a nice spring day at the gun club shooting little clay targets is a lot different than a cold drizzle in October, you are in the brush your feet are soaked and your target is running.
    That is pretty much how I shoot High Power Silhouette, just no sling as it's not permitted. It takes lots of practice to get your form down and to have trigger control. I would say to get a 3x9 scope or at least get a trigger with a lighter adjustable pull like the Rifle Basix. You can also start by moving the target closer as off the bench that rifle is capable if much tighter groups. Are you reloading for it? It doesn't hurt to make sure the stock isn't too loose or too tight. Same thing with scope screws on the bases and rings, which scope are you using?

  7. #7
    Team Savage gumbo333's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    49
    If you are practicing for deer hunting, shooting standing, try using a shooting stick or sticks. Really really helps steady the hold.

  8. #8
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    12
    Will try moving the target in to around 60 yards and shooting bowling pins instead. The rifle is set up with a Leopold 4x scope and I am hand loading. Got the group size down to 1.18 inch average over 5 groups of 4 shoots each. Can't say I find the trigger bad at all, but to me the bolt really feels crappy, short and stubby and just barely clears the scope. I have plans for a 3x9 scope and to upgrade the bolt. I really like this rifle but my thinking is to not pour a bunch of money into upgrades on a $350 firearm.

  9. #9
    Team Savage GaCop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Warner Robins, Ga
    Age
    72
    Posts
    3,633
    Quote Originally Posted by Herby View Post
    Will try moving the target in to around 60 yards and shooting bowling pins instead. The rifle is set up with a Leopold 4x scope and I am hand loading. Got the group size down to 1.18 inch average over 5 groups of 4 shoots each. Can't say I find the trigger bad at all, but to me the bolt really feels crappy, short and stubby and just barely clears the scope. I have plans for a 3x9 scope and to upgrade the bolt. I really like this rifle but my thinking is to not pour a bunch of money into upgrades on a $350 firearm.
    The Axis is not a bad platform to work with. A better bolt handle will eliminate any issues working the bolt. Upgrading optics, buy the best you can afford. Take a look at Vortex scopes. The Vortex is reasonably priced and they have a great no BS warranty.
    Vietnam Vet, Jun 66 - Dec 67

  10. #10
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    12
    Thank you - both those things are on the list. By the way - a question about optics. A good no BS warranty is a nice thing, but lets say you are on a 10 day drop-camp hunt out in the west, 7 miles by foot from the road and your scope fogs up... if money were not an object what scope would you chose just for rock solid toughness and reliability?

  11. #11
    Basic Member SageRat Shooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    1,038
    Quote Originally Posted by Herby View Post
    Thank you - both those things are on the list. By the way - a question about optics. A good no BS warranty is a nice thing, but lets say you are on a 10 day drop-camp hunt out in the west, 7 miles by foot from the road and your scope fogs up... if money were not an object what scope would you chose just for rock solid toughness and reliability?
    NightForce or Schmidt&Bender

  12. #12
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    12
    Dang, I would think so. Gotta save up for that.

  13. #13
    Basic Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Central Arizona
    Posts
    122
    It is pretty rare to see a scope fog up anymore, even on some of the budget scopes. Usually the issues are tracking and consistently holding zero which some Athlon and Vortex scopes are notorious for. But the Vortex scopes have a strong following. It is hard to beat Leupold for durability but the eye relief seems to shrink as you increase the power but if you slip and fall and bump the scope it will still hold zero.

  14. #14
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    12
    Following up - my last session at the range I was shooting up the last of my ammo - just 7 rounds. I tried something different, 6 bowling pins spread out at 60 to 100 yards. Shooting off hand and fast, actually nailed all 6 pins and got a "nice shooting" compliment from the fellow next to me. I think a big part of training to shoot off hand is setting up to build confidence. Don't beat yourself up if you can't hit a 4 inch clay pigeon at 100 yards every time. Go with a bigger target closer in and nail it! Then, move it out further.

    My gut feeling is the Axis is ready for hunting season as it came out of the box. It shoots well under 1.5 inch groups, consistently. For myself it handles well. I have no trouble with the stock trigger and am getting used to the bolt. Really high quality optics would be nice, but the old Leupold 4x is what I am used to.

    So, on a tight budget I am putting all my shooting dollars into brass, powder bullets and primers.

  15. #15
    Basic Member
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    41
    You just have to shoot a lot. Standing position requires a lot of discipline. A lot of repetition. You might consider shooting a .22 or even an air rifle to get in as much trigger time as it will take to get good at it.

  16. #16
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by RCE1 View Post
    You just have to shoot a lot. Standing position requires a lot of discipline. A lot of repetition. You might consider shooting a .22 or even an air rifle to get in as much trigger time as it will take to get good at it.
    Very true. I am snipping sparrows and sage rats every chance I get with a pellet gun...

  17. #17
    Basic Member
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    41
    I used to do a lot of Black Powder Cartridge Silhouette shooting. I was in Big Timber once and visited a well known national champion of the sport. He is an excellent offhand shot, which separates the champions from the rest of the herd in BPCRS, and leaning in a corner of his shop, there was a spring piston air rifle...

  18. #18
    Basic Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Northern MN
    Posts
    263
    Quote Originally Posted by Herby View Post
    Thank you - both those things are on the list. By the way - a question about optics. A good no BS warranty is a nice thing, but lets say you are on a 10 day drop-camp hunt out in the west, 7 miles by foot from the road and your scope fogs up... if money were not an object what scope would you chose just for rock solid toughness and reliability?
    I trust my Burris XTR2's to be a super rugged scope and always track perfect.

  19. #19
    Administrator J.Baker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    NW Ohio
    Age
    44
    Posts
    5,685
    How often do you take 4 shots at a deer or other animal while hunting? Even 2 or 3 shots for that matter? Usually they're long gone by the time you miss the first shot, chamber another round and try to get back on target. Given that, I would focus more on shooting a single shot and spacing them out a few minutes. Get up and walk around or get a drink or whatever between shots, then when it's time for the next one practice from the rest or port arms position the same as you would while hunting. Bring the gun up, establish you position and take your shot.

    You'll get less stressed and fatigued this way and it's more applicable practice for the field than trying to shoot a small group with a string of shots. Also lets the barrel cool down so you'll always be shooting a cold bore just like in the field.
    "Life' is tough. It's even tougher if you're stupid." ~ John Wayne
    “Under certain circumstances, 
urgent circumstances, desperate circumstances, profanity provides a relief denied even to prayer.” —Mark Twain

  20. #20
    Basic Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    363
    If you’re hitting a clay pigeon at 100 more often than not, you’re already shooting better than most of us except for the bullshitters. Keep up the good work!

  21. #21
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    12
    Actually, I hesitate to admit but several times deer hunting I have had to take more than one shot.... nerves, excitement, surprise or fatigue - I have missed the first shot. Clean missed. The thing about mule deer seems to be they will run off a little, then stop and look back. This has happened twice. So, knowing how things go for me - my practice includes slow and deliberate shooting, as well as quick and more instinctive shooting of multiple spaced targets. (Bowling pins) The 7mm - 08 is great. Should have switched from the 30-06 long ago.



    By no means am I hitting clay pigeons at 100 yards more often than not from a standing position. Sitting position yes. Bowling pins - quiet a bit bigger yes.

    119 days till deer season!

Similar Threads

  1. Looking for advice
    By Benci in forum Savage 210, 212 & 220 Bolt-Actions
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-26-2015, 12:49 AM
  2. Need some advice
    By snapcase in forum Introduce Yourself
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 07-12-2014, 11:19 AM
  3. Need advice.
    By Grizzly2279 in forum 110-Series Bolt-Action Rifles
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-09-2012, 07:15 AM
  4. advice on building a stevens rifle for hunting/longer range accuracy
    By logic factory in forum 110-Series Bolt-Action Rifles
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 09-19-2011, 12:19 AM
  5. Looking for a little advice
    By pikergolf in forum 110-Series Bolt-Action Rifles
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 11-28-2010, 05:06 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •