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Thread: Salt Bath Annealing, Pro's and Con's.

  1. #26
    Basic Member darkker's Avatar
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    That's excellent, thank you for the link.
    I'm a firm believer in the theory that if it bleeds, I can kill it.

  2. #27
    Team Savage
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    Just to clarify a bit, the 3rd and 4th photos are of the baffle/case holder. The second of the two show the neck holder that suspends the brass to a fixed depth in the salt bath, which is adjusted to submerge only the portion you want. I prefer the salt to cover the neck and about half the shoulder.

    The 1000 degree temp really does nothing to the composition of the brass in the short time it's heated. Annealing is dependent upon time at temperature, the hotter the temp, the faster the annealing process is completed. I found this process is actually faster then using a propane torch which burns at 3600*F (1980* C)
    and unlikely to overheat the brass because it heats evenly inside and out.

    If you like, you can google "salt bath annealing cartridge brass" to find some good video's, or go directly to the BallisticRecreations website link provided.

    Good luck and good shooting.
    Give a man a gun and he can rob a bank. Give a man a bank and he can rob the world. Never forget what Wall Street did in 2008.

  3. #28
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    DARKKER:

    "As originally spec'd, C260 was a certain mix, with a tensile strength spec'd at 70-75,000psi. ..... If someone else uses a different alloy, or tensile rating, it may not translate as well as hoped."



    I analyzed some cases for my brother a few months ago, I thought Lapua was in here, it's not, but for what the info is worth here it is, I hope it contributes to the thread. This data is listed as MFG and Caliber, I do not know if the recipe translates across all calibers for a given MFG. This data is for a specific case, for a specific caliber, from a specific MFG.

    Industry Brass 260 aka “Cartridge Brass”
    Comments: Cartridge Brass
    Copper, Cu 68.5 - 71.5 %
    Zinc, Zn 28.5 - 31.5 %
    Iron, Fe <= 0.050 %
    Lead, Pb <= 0.070 %
    Other, total <= 0.15 %

    Federal 6.5 Creedmor
    Comments: Brass 260
    Copper 70.03%
    Zinc 29.81%
    Manganese .01%
    Iron .05%
    Tin .01%

    Remington 280 Remington
    Comments: Brass 260
    Copper 71.55%
    Zinc 28.25%
    Aluminum .12%
    Phosphorous .01%
    Iron .04%
    Tin .03%

    Winchester .243 Win
    Comments: Brass 260
    Copper 69.99%
    Zinc 29.52%
    Aluminum .29%
    Iron .06%
    Nickle .03%
    Tin .11%


    Starline 7MM-08
    Comments: 443
    Copper 73.67%
    Zinc 26.23%
    Tin .04%
    Iron .04%
    Manganese .01%
    Phosphorous .01%

  4. #29
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    I nuked some at work on time. I have the data sheet I documented the stuff on somewhere around here. If you are working with a recently calibrated gun with a new sensor(from what I am told) they are crazy accurate. I have had some cutting fluids cause them too lie before though so everything has to be clean. Thanks for posting that. Check the blue box and the gold box Lapua brass that everyone claims is the same.
    Standard rings are like a fat girl sitting on a sandwich.

  5. #30
    Team Savage
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    To read results of some definitive testing, see this test report under the home tab. http://www.savageshooters.com/conten...Case-Annealing

    Bottom line: Anneal every time for consistent neck tension, and use a bushing (or mandrel) die. Conventional dies using an expander ball will overwork even the freshly annealed brass. Neck tension is a function of brass harness and interference fit and will affect shot to shot consistency accordingly.

    Annealing is complete at 1000*F for a few seconds, and those temps will not change zinc contents of brass.

    The tests were conducted with an induction type annealer, where annealing temps are tightly controlled. There was no mention of salt emersion type annealing.

    YMMV.
    Give a man a gun and he can rob a bank. Give a man a bank and he can rob the world. Never forget what Wall Street did in 2008.

  6. #31
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    I wasn't concerned about ruining brass, but I understood that was Darkkers thinking. If you were loosing Zink, your salt would have a dark layer on the bottom of the hardened plug.

    This was a great post Texas. Thanks for taking the time for the review. It helped push me over the edge on getting one.
    Standard rings are like a fat girl sitting on a sandwich.

  7. #32
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    Great info, where do you get the two disks ? and is there a bottom disk for small cases like 223's and a large one for 308 size cases ??

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shooter0302 View Post
    Great info, where do you get the two disks ? and is there a bottom disk for small cases like 223's and a large one for 308 size cases ??

    http://ballisticrecreations.ca/salt_...aling-kit-rev/
    Standard rings are like a fat girl sitting on a sandwich.

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