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Thread: How many of you have actually needed to survive?

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by LoneWolf View Post
    I try! My wife is terrified of getting lost, so whenever we are off the beaten path I've told her that we were just misplaced. If you know which way you're facing, have a map, have gas in the tank, and food, water and what not... You're not lost... Just misplaced!

    Sent from my HTCEVOV4G using Tapatalk 2
    Gotta love the redneck woman I'm married to. She will usually take point when we hike/ hunt. Always knows which direction we're headed & where we came from. I was pretty impressed when she was showing one of the grandkids how to navigate by the sun & stars.
    One of these days I hope to teach her about wearing shoes.
    'Scuse me while I whip this out...

  2. #17
    I survived 30 years of insane backwoods in-laws. Aggregate IQ of 71 between the three of them. There can be no misadventure like that experience. There is no way my wife came from their loins.

  3. #18
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    Sounds like my 'ol lady's family. If I didn't know better I'd swear they're a bunch of inbreeds.

    My brother-in-law has his own language. They understand him fine. I have no idea what he's saying 2/3's of the time.
    'Scuse me while I whip this out...

  4. #19
    Paid Member snowgetter1's Avatar
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    Me and a buddy did a 4 day three night "survival" trip a long time ago. It was squirrel season and we thought we would catch enough fish and shoot squirrels to eat. Caught like two fish and got 2-3 squirrels per day. We were very hungry and to make it more realistic we didn't even bring beer. Big mistake!

    I have lived like an animal for long periods of time in the Army, but only about twice did it get close to where we thought we would really be in trouble with supplies.

  5. #20
    Registered User Navigation's Avatar
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    Many years ago, I was lost while hunting in northern Maine. I was 16, and decided to hike out about 6 miles from camp. I had a compass, and a map (not a topo) of the few roads up that way...and headed into the logging country, with a knife, map and compass, canteen and Winchester 30-30 and a box of shells, and a Smith a Wesson model 15 loaded with no extra 38s on me.
    I had been taught to dead recon by my Step Dad who was a Ranger in the Army, and thought I would be OK. It didn't really dawn on me, that I had walked to a few to many clear cuts that all looked the same, and that I had gotten turned around. In my defense, I saw a small herd of deer, at a distance to far for my open sights, and got really excited.
    Well, I had to walk due east for the rest of the day, I eventually came out on a small highway, 12 miles from hunting camp, and was picked up by another hunter, given a ride home...he said I did good for just being a kid, and that if I had walked the other way, I would had never been found...LOL. I was pretty mad at myself, and started studying land navigation after that...but I never got as good as I should have been until I went into the Army myself. I love topo maps...and nice warm days in the woods..good stuff.
    knifesmith and humble student of long range shooting..

  6. #21
    Paid Member Westcliffe01's Avatar
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    My wife and I generally make an annual trip to the UP and stay at the Muskalongue state park. For years there was an outfitter operation near the mouth of the Two Hearted river called Rainbow Lodge. It used to be that if you took any logging trail anywhere you would sooner or later find a Rainbow Lodge sign which would provide directions back to the state road, which way to the Lodge (and distances) or to the state park etc.

    A bit more than a year ago, one of the many brush fires in the area ran right through the lodge area and it was totally destroyed. I assume it was not insured for fire and has not been rebuilt. What I did not know, and "discovered" was that "someone" had removed every Rainbow lodge sign from the entire area. Essentially, this removed about 99% of signs except for ATV trail route markers.

    Having explored the area extensively over years, we decided to see what had happened to Rainbow Lodge and possibly take some sunset pictures on the beach at the Two hearted river. We must have left at about 5pm, and thought we had plenty of time before sunset at about 9:30pm.... First of many assumptions.. Long story short, we could not find our way to the lodge site, since all the signs were gone. The only signposted item was the Crisp Point lighthouse, so after hours of searching we headed there. It is a very remote location down a very bad road.. Got there just before sunset, took some pictures and then decided to head back. BUT, unlike times past, there was no sign whatsoever directing traffic back to the county road. I had set a waypoint for the intersection we had turned off the county road, so I just had the GPS navigate back to that waypoint., What I did NOT realize was that my expensive Garmin was treating ATV trails as equal to roads and even displayed them the same. To see the minor roads you needed to be zoomed all the way in, which then gave you no situational awareness. If you zoomed out, zou could see no roads/trails whatsoever. Anyway, we realized that we were in trouble when the "road" we were on suddenly narrowed to about 6ft wide and the truck mirrors were wider than the trail markers.

    So we figured that all we had to do was head south and sooner or later we would hit the county road (there is only one). The problem was that we had managed to get on the "wrong" side of the 2 hearted river gorge so every southern track petered out before you would find yourself plunging down into the river washout. Finally we figured that out so we had to head east to try to find a way across the river. The trails ran through thick sand, side slopes and I was afraid that if this was combined with some woods that we would get truly stuck. I was driving a 4wd F250, not made for ATV trails. Finally by a total fluke we crossed a road that we knew and was able to follow it south to get back to our original waypoint. We got back to camp just before midnight with just a few gal of fuel remaining in the tanks. The area we had been in had no cell phone service and does have black bear, wolves and coyotes. I did have my 1911, but my wife and grand daughter were not up for walking ATV trails at night with critters on the fringes.

    This happened in mid summer, but I could see how if this had been Nov/Dec and add some snow, it could quickly have become a life threatening situation. In times past, with the logistical support of the lodge (fuel, food etc) we would have been discovered by ATV trail riders the next day, but now that fuel is a few hours away, who knows when someone would have passed by ?

    In August I went exploring in Colorado and I made sure to take along an old aviation GPS which has a "track" function. The "roads" that I used are not to be found on any road type GPS and were not even on the topo map that I had with me, so by carefully using the track function, I was able to document the roads that were there and could follow them back (back tracking) to get back to where my truck was parked. I was using a Kubota RTV 500 and it was perfect for the terrain (steep, rocky, loose surface). I had no issues that trip.

  7. #22
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    Several years ago a buddy and I were out scouting for deer when we went off in a very unexpected direction.
    When we thought that we were about to come up on the road we came in on we topped the hill to nowhere!
    A storm was coming in and took away our sun and for awhile I was "miss placed" neither of us we prepared to spend the night in the woods especially with the weather getting colder by the hour.
    after what seemed like hours(a couple) we were able to get ourselves out to a road only to find out that we were about 5 miles from where we went in.
    Since that day I am ALWAYS prepared to to "survive" and or find my way out.
    Neither my buddy or myself ever admitted to being scared that day, but I know that I was.
    be prepared gentlemen, and hope that you never face it.

  8. #23
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    Highly recommend a portable solar charger when heading out to the back country. Also printing off some topo maps and carrying a good ol compass is always a fine idea. (oh yeah, learn how to use a map a compass too)

  9. #24
    Paid Member tufrthnails's Avatar
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    Spent the night in Green Swamp here in Florida. Not really parimount survival, but sucked nonetheless. Made it out the next morning. Not real happy with my buddy who just figured I was late getting out of stand and left. GPS died and I had left my compass in the truck. not sure how much swamp time you guys have but a TOPO is useless here in FL. Trail map and a good compass is required, GPS is nice but batteries die and such.
    Quote Originally Posted by fgw_in_fla View Post
    We told you so...

  10. #25
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    I got stuck out in a blizzard for 16 hours back in Feb 2011. Of course, I was in my car and new right where I was (9 miles from home, and stuck out with about a dozen other drivers). Worst part was that my car wasn't actually stuck, we just couldn't get around a few cars that were, and there was no way to turnaround.

    Between being a scout, and having my Mom constantly reminding me to be prepared, I always keep a bag with supplies, extra clothes, blankets and such in my trunk, so I was toasty warm all night. Just had to get out and keep the snow from blocking the tailpipe every now and then. Only used about an eighth of a tank of gas for the night (cycled between running and not). Couple buddies came out on snowmobiles and picked me up the next morning. My car was stuck out there for another day and a half.

  11. #26
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    where i hunt in pa is the most remote area in the state. that said it would be hard to be more than
    a half mile or so from a road or some type of a power or pipeline. using a compass and plotting a coarse
    is a requirment in obtaining a charter captains licence and a reason many fail. or at least used to fail
    when the test was only given by the u s coast guard. knowledge is the answer to most questions.
    i had a very good friend who by his hard work was able to take an alaskan hunt in the early 70s.
    it was a guided hunt with 2 hunters and 2 guides who worked for a well known outfitter. they were dropped off by float plane
    on the shore of a lake where they made their main camp. bottom line of a long story is my friend never made it home from the hunt and was never seen again. he left a wife and 3 sons.

  12. #27
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    I have never been lost, have been turned around a few times in the dark when I was a kid following my hounds. In those instances I would kick up a pile of leaves, dig in and wait 'till morning. I did get myself in a pretty bad fix one time while turkey hunting. I was a couple miles in from the truck on a high knob listening for birds and blew out a knee. This was way before cell phones and nobody knew my exact location and all I could do was crawl. I got my pocket knife out and cut a couple of splints from a nearby sumac patch and tied them on with strips cut from my shirt. Once I got my knee pretty well stabilized I unloaded my shotgun and used it for a cane and was able to hobble my way back to the truck in a couple of hours. Driving home was an experience with only one foot for the gas, brake and clutch.
    It's better to shoot for the moon and hit the fencepost than to shoot for the fencepost and hit the ground!

  13. #28
    Paid Member ShowMeShooter's Avatar
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    I got lost coon hunting one night, but as soon as the sun started coming up I found the truck.
    Only harm done was a sick day used at work. I was a bit touchy and hungry my morning though.

  14. #29
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    never actually had to survive myself. that being said I'm an eagle scout and have taught the wilderness survival merit badge at summer camps for a few years before becoming a guide for the trek program. I have done a few "survival" expeditions. i go out for usually no more than a week with the 10 essentials and a mix of other survival gear i carry when backpacking or camping. a really good way to help "hone" your skills for whenever the need really does come up. always make sure to have 4 levels of finding my way back if i actually do get lost somehow (i stay on marked trails that aren't well known and commonly used but well worn and cut enough to easily make it back) 1 is memory 2 is map and compass 3 is gps and if all else fails 4 is back to basics using sun stars etc.

    sort of qualifies as a survival story: While out hunting a few seasons back i came across an older couple (older to me anyways maybe late 30s early 40s) who decided to go camping well off the beaten path even though neither of them had much experience at all, most of their gear including a tent stove and cook kit apparently still had tags on it when they left judging by the packaging strewn about. turns out they didn't tell anyone where they were going or when they would be back and we were well out of cell service by then. their car wouldn't start and left them to go another night without food and barely had a half gallon of water left. neither of them knew how to start a fire and if you have ever been in the tops tops mountains of southern california you know it gets pretty darn hot during the day but down right frigid at night. i hiked back about 2 or 3 miles to my truck and made my way back up to them and ended up getting their car going after a jump start. helped them pack up and lead them back down the mountain. needless to say they were a bit shook up and tired but hopefully learned a lesson. never did fill my tag that year.

  15. #30
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    In the swamp behind my house you better have a compass or gps. It looks the same for miles. The canopy is so dense its really only daylight for a few hours while the sun is directly overhead.
    Its an easy place to get turned around.

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