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Thread: Lug lapping tool for full contact.

  1. #1
    Registered User big honkin jeep's Avatar
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    Lug lapping tool for full contact.

    I know that the floating bolt head goes a long way twords making full lug contact a non issue on most Savage rifles but there is always room for improvement. I was checking into obtaining a lug lapping tool and found this
    http://home.comcast.net/~jesse99/lappingtool.html
    I like the idea of the DIY aspect of it as well as the cash savings :) and the ability to use it on multiple makes of rifles.
    as long as I reset the headspace when I'm done lapping, does anyone see any other pros or cons to using such a tool?
    A good woman and a steady job has ruined many a great hunter.

  2. #2
    It is a waste of time, and will make things worse. I have worked on many actions that someone "lapped" the lugs, only to make things worse to the point the bolt head needed replaced. The technology that is commonly applied to Remingtons and other solid bolt actions does not apply to Savages.
    "As long as there's lead in the air....there's still hope.."

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    Registered User big honkin jeep's Avatar
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    Thanks for the heads up Fred.
    A good woman and a steady job has ruined many a great hunter.

  4. #4
    Paid Member 82boy's Avatar
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    Think about it this way, What are you doing when you lap something? Answer is: you are placing an abrasive compound on a high side, in an attempt to wear it off or down. Now think about this; in order to do achieve what I described in the sentence before, you need the high spot to hit the same place every time, so that it can wear, right? Now if the bolt head is floating, are you hitting the same high spot every time? This is why it is a waste of time, and all you are doing is prematurely wearing out parts.
    Patrick
    "To win in bench rest, you dont have to shoot small groups, you just can't shoot any big ones." ;)

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    Registered User big honkin jeep's Avatar
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    I appreciate the explanation. Makes more sense inside my head now anyway. In this case as I have gotten some well earned grey in my beard, Simple warnings from those who have been there done that or learned things the hard way usually suffice. (Thanks Fred) Much more than back in the younger hard headed days anyway :)
    The explanation as it relates to the floating bolthead is nice and helps understand the mechanics of what is actually happening better. (Thanks 82)

    Thanks to you all BHJ
    A good woman and a steady job has ruined many a great hunter.

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    Call me confused??? I always thought lapping the bolt head was done to the outside surface that fits against the barrel, and not to the inner surface that the brass sits in.

    That way the outer surface of the bolt head fits closer and tighter to the barrel surface. It sounds like "accurizing" is making sure the front face and the rear face of the bolt head are flat and parallel to the barrel face???

  7. #7
    Paid Member 82boy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brasse View Post
    Call me confused??? I always thought lapping the bolt head was done to the outside surface that fits against the barrel, and not to the inner surface that the brass sits in.

    That way the outer surface of the bolt head fits closer and tighter to the barrel surface. It sounds like "accurizing" is making sure the front face and the rear face of the bolt head are flat and parallel to the barrel face???
    No, when lapping bolt lugs, the area in question is; the back of the lugs where they make contact with the lug abutments and ramps. (In the front of the action.) The barrel doesn't contact the front of the bolt face, there needs to be a bit of clearance between the two or it can cause harmonic problems. A Savage is not like a Remington where they have their patented "3 rings of steel," where the bolt head fits into the barrel. The tool shown uses a case to put rearward pressure on the bolt forcing it back, where the lugs are against the lug abutments. The space between the barrel and the face of the bolt head is called "headspace." This is why you use a gauge or a piece of brass, to set the barrel on when installing.
    Last edited by 82boy; 04-26-2013 at 03:24 PM.
    Patrick
    "To win in bench rest, you dont have to shoot small groups, you just can't shoot any big ones." ;)

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    Quote Originally Posted by brasse View Post
    Call me confused??? I always thought lapping the bolt head was done to the outside surface that fits against the barrel, and not to the inner surface that the brass sits in.
    OK, Hi Confused

    Your lapping the lugs and the abutments to each other, why it increases the headspace. It removes material setting the bolt back away from the chamber. If the headspace was set with only one lug making contact .005", once its removed by lapping the headspace would increase the same amount or .005".

    Bill

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