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Thread: Gunsmith Lathes

  1. #1

    Gunsmith Lathes

    Sorry Mods I did not know where to post this, "maybe there should be a gunsmithing section" anyways I am looking at gunsmithing lathes, Grizzly - Smithy - Jet ect is there one brand or model better than they other, I am talking entry level or close to it, see it is a help me decide question only on a lathe not a caliber.

    Tanks Dean

  2. #2
    Paid Member Blue Avenger's Avatar
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    :) Have often wondered myself. I was noticing Northern had one the were touting as a gunsmith lathe. Free shipping = no surprise.
    http://www.northerntool.com/shop/too...3984_200423984


    When you start getting into the long beds for the 30" barrels they jack the price. The smaller models have no or to small of a spindle bore to be of use.
    My next problem would be the garage floor. Mine is not very good with the cold weather heaving and I would have to brake up a spot and re-pour a thicker slab that would not crack and twist.
    Last edited by Blue Avenger; 12-08-2012 at 12:24 PM.
    .223 Rem AI, .22-250 AI, .220 Swift AI .243 Win AI, .6mm Rem AI, .257 Rob AI, .25-06 AI, 6.5x300wsm .30-06 AI, .270 STW, 7mm STW, .416 Taylor

  3. #3
    I had not seen that one That's Nice, what makes it a "gunsmith lathe" what features does it half to have to be referred as one over a regular lathe.

    Tanks Dean
    Last edited by scope eye; 12-08-2012 at 12:23 PM. Reason: spellink

  4. #4
    Paid Member Blue Avenger's Avatar
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    Staff answer from Northern...

    A gunsmith lathe is the same as a regular lathe, it just has a few extra features added to it that are specifically tailored for the gunsmith. Features such as high precision spindle bearings. Ball bearing tipped steady and follow rests, large spindle bores, tailstocks that are lockable with a torque wrench and 4 brass tipped spider bolts on the outboard side of the main spindle for supporting barrels.
    .223 Rem AI, .22-250 AI, .220 Swift AI .243 Win AI, .6mm Rem AI, .257 Rob AI, .25-06 AI, 6.5x300wsm .30-06 AI, .270 STW, 7mm STW, .416 Taylor

  5. #5
    A gunsmith lathe is the same as a regular lathe, it just has a few extra features added to it that are specifically tailored for the gunsmith. Features such as high precision spindle bearings. Ball bearing tipped steady and follow rests, large spindle bores, tailstocks that are lockable with a torque wrench and 4 brass tipped spider bolts on the outboard side of the main spindle for supporting barrels.
    And (according to my Machine Tech Instructor) if they're doing it correctly the "bottom end" of the gearing should be slower by as much as half compared to the "Standard" metal working lathes on the market.

  6. #6
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    I'm a Fan of the Acer 1340G, I've seen shops where there are some ACER's that have been used EVERY DAY for 15 years and you can still line the tail stock on them and cut center with ease. They come with HArdened Ground ways and the tail stocks are fitted to the machine. The gearing is very repeatable and I believe comes with a 2hp motor(don't quote me) Gear changes are simple and daily mantenance is pretty easy. Also as mentioned by Detritus, ther really isn't a gunsmith lathe per say but a Bench Lathe That you can taylor to your needs by the tools you by. Usually a 36" bench lathe is more than enough for the professional gunsmith. The MAchinist Tools and Technology sixth edition is a good starting point for lathe work

    As Far as Grizzly goes, I'd stay away from them. I've used some of their drill presses, and it seems as though they got good ideas, but they're built more like the Ryobi of machines. Lot of problems with bad fits, cheap cast parts and crappy screws.
    .

    The only problem with ACER is you won't find a lot on the used market, everybody loves them.!

    I in no way support any certain product, I just like what works and this is solely my humblest opinion.

    KC

  7. #7
    So far I have found that the ones made in china lose there close tolerance rather quickly, and they still struggle to make decent bearings, the ones made in Taiwan are much better, it may all sound the same to they casual observer but there is a difference, except for the Jet brand which are made in china but it is there own factory with there own specs, which I am leaning towards.

    Tanks Dean

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