• Savage .223 Remington Twist Rate History

    Over the years Savage Arms has used three different twist rates on their firearms chambered for the .223 Remington cartridge. This is primarily due to the increase in bullet weights being used by the U.S. Military and NATO ammunition, and as the bullet weights went up the twist rate had to increase accordingly to ensure bullet stabilization. Savage used 1-9", 1-12" and 1-14" twist rates for rifles chambered in .223.

    Note: The .223 Remington cartridge was never offered in the Savage 110-Series platform prior to 1986. Prior to 1986 the .223 Remington cartridge was only offered in the Model 340 bolt-action rifle and the Model 24 combination guns. The Model 340 was discontinued at the end of 1985, thus necessitating the need to offer the .223 Rem. in the 110-Series rifles.

    1:14" Twist Rate
    This twist rate was used on ALL Savage rifles chambered in .223 up through the end of 1991. After that this twist rate was only used on the Model 24 combination guns up through their being discontinued in 2007.

    This twist rate is suitable for most bullets weighing up to 55 grains.


    1:12" Twist Rate
    In 1992 Savage made the change from using the 1:14" twist rate to the slightly faster 1:12" twist rate on all 110-Series rifles. This permitted the use of ammunition loaded with slightly heavier bullets, including 62 grain FMJ military surplus ammo. All Model 24's continued to use the 1:14" twist rate.

    This twist rate is suitable for most bullets weighing up to 65 grains.


    1:9" Twist Rate
    Savage first employed the 1:9" twist rate in 1993 on the Model 110FP. This was to accommodate the longer, heavier match-grade boattail bullets being used by precision marksmen in both the military and law enforcement circles. All other 110-Series rifles chambered in .223 Remington this year continued to use the 1:12" twist rate, and all Model 24's continued to use the 1:14" twist rate.

    In 1994 Savage again used this twist rate in the Model 110FP and also used it for the Model 112BT in the Varmint Series. All other 110-Series rifles chambered in .223 Remington this year continued to use the 1:12" twist rate, and all Model 24's continued to use the 1:14" twist rate.

    In 1995 Savage started using this twist rate (1:9") universally on all 110-Series rifles. All Model 24's continued to use the 1:14" twist rate.

    This twist rate is suitable for most bullets weighing between 50 and 75 grains.

    1:7" Twist Rate
    Beginning in 2007 Savage started offering the faster 1:7" twist rate as an option in their top of the Model 12 LRPV and the Model 10 Predator Hunter. 2007 was the only year for the faster twist in the Predator Hunter.

    In 2008 the 1:7" twist continued in the Model 12LRPV and also became an option in the Model 12 VLP.

    In 2010 the Model 12 F/TR became available with the 1:7" twist rate option.

    The faster 1:7" twist also became available in the Model 11 Lightweight Hunter in 2011.

    Starting in 2012 Savage expanded the 1:7" twist option to include the Model 12 BVSS and the Model 12 BTCSS. This was the only year either of these models were offered with the faster twist.

    As of the 2015 Savage Arms catalog, the Model 12 VLP, Model 12 LRPV and the Model 12 F/TR are still being offered with the 1:7" twist rate option.


    This article was originally published in forum thread: Model 112 .223 barrel twist started by umpreacher View original post
    Comments 10 Comments
    1. Berger.Fan222's Avatar
      Berger.Fan222 -
      I think their Model 12 F-Class now has a 1 in 7 twist in .223 Rem.
    1. Newsshooter's Avatar
      Newsshooter -
      It does and has for awhile.
    1. LeverHunter's Avatar
      LeverHunter -
      Does anyone know what the Savage Axis twist rates are?
    1. flylo's Avatar
      flylo -
      FYI, the 223 Hog Hunter is now on sale @ Woodbryoutfitter.com for $341.99 +$30 shipping.
    1. Berger.Fan222's Avatar
      Berger.Fan222 -
      Quote Originally Posted by jonbearman View Post
      With a 1 in 12 the short 60 grain like a hornady hollow point is as much as you can stabilize. The 69 grain will keyhole for sure.
      Somewhere I recall reading that since stability depends on air density, heavier than expected bullets can be stabilized at higher altitudes, so the limitations at sea level might not apply at higher elevations. Do a google search for bullet stability calculator and plug in your numbers. I think the formula is called something like the Miller twist rule.
    1. tammons's Avatar
      tammons -
      Quote Originally Posted by LeverHunter View Post
      Does anyone know what the Savage Axis twist rates are?
      My Axis is a 9 twist.
    1. tammons's Avatar
      tammons -
      There were several Factory 223 Savage rifles that had 1:7 twist barrels.
      The F-Class rifles are the latest but about 5+- years ago you could get some of the Varmint rifles in 1:7 twist. Also I have heard that Savage made some 1:7 twist sporter 223 barrels, but I have never seen one personally.
    1. Cyclops's Avatar
      Cyclops -
      Purchased a Savage Model 12 VLP DPM in .223 last year for FTR shooting.
      It has a 1:7 twist barrel.

      We shoot 80 gr A-Max with 24.7 gr ADI AR2208 (Varget equivalent) in Norma cases out to 1000 yards.
      In higher winds it can be challenging at 1000 yards.
    1. OldLobo's Avatar
      OldLobo -
      Quote Originally Posted by tammons View Post
      There were several Factory 223 Savage rifles that had 1:7 twist barrels.
      The F-Class rifles are the latest but about 5+- years ago you could get some of the Varmint rifles in 1:7 twist. Also I have heard that Savage made some 1:7 twist sporter 223 barrels, but I have never seen one personally.
      They did "unofficially" produce a few sporters in 1:7 as noted by tammons, they were sold at Walmart stores as a different serial#/model# string in the Savage Axis. Looking today, I see the Axis 2 with accutrigger listed as 1:9, and the original Axis as 1:7 on the signs attached to the rifles. I own one of the odd 1:7 models, and it shoots excellent, I never have gone over 75gr though. If you call Savage as I did, they will tell you there is no such animal, but I and a few others have checked and they indeed do exist. I can not verify whether current production models have continued with the trend, but I was tickled when I found what I had, one of few "good surprises" and to me an added bonus!
    1. MrFurious's Avatar
      MrFurious -
      Added the 1:7 twist info based on what's listed in the catalogs, but can't/won't speculate as to what other special run models may have being made using it.

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