• Savage .223 Remington Twist Rate History

    Over the years Savage Arms has used four different twist rates on their firearms chambered for the .223 Remington cartridge. This is primarily due to the increase in bullet weights being used by the U.S. Military and NATO ammunition, and as the bullet weights went up the twist rate had to increase accordingly to ensure bullet stabilization. Savage has used 1-7", 1-9", 1-12" and 1-14" twist rates for rifles chambered in .223.

    2018 Update: Savage has added a fifth twist rate for rifles chambered in .223 Remington. This twist rate is 1-8" and is only being used on the MSR15 rifles.

    It's worth pointing out that the .223 Remington cartridge was never offered in the Savage 110-Series platform prior to 1986. Prior to 1986 the .223 Remington cartridge was only offered in the Model 340 bolt-action rifle and the Model 24 combination guns. The Model 340 was discontinued at the end of 1985, thus necessitating the need to offer the .223 Rem. in the 110-Series rifles.

    1:14" Twist Rate
    This twist rate was used on ALL Savage rifles chambered in .223 up through the end of 1991. After that this twist rate was only used on the Model 24 combination guns up through their being discontinued in 2007.

    This twist rate is suitable for most bullets weighing up to 55 grains.


    1:12" Twist Rate
    In 1992 Savage made the change from using the 1:14" twist rate to the slightly faster 1:12" twist rate on all 110-Series rifles. This permitted the use of ammunition loaded with slightly heavier bullets, including 62 grain FMJ military surplus ammo. All Model 24's continued to use the 1:14" twist rate.

    This twist rate is suitable for most bullets weighing up to 65 grains.


    1:9" Twist Rate
    Savage first employed the 1:9" twist rate in 1993 on the Model 110FP. This was to accommodate the longer, heavier match-grade boattail bullets being used by precision marksmen in both the military and law enforcement circles. All other 110-Series rifles chambered in .223 Remington this year continued to use the 1:12" twist rate, and all Model 24's continued to use the 1:14" twist rate.

    In 1994 Savage again used this twist rate in the Model 110FP and also used it for the Model 112BT in the Varmint Series. All other 110-Series rifles chambered in .223 Remington this year continued to use the 1:12" twist rate, and all Model 24's continued to use the 1:14" twist rate.

    In 1995 Savage started using this twist rate (1:9") universally on all 110-Series rifles. All Model 24's continued to use the 1:14" twist rate.

    This twist rate is suitable for most bullets weighing between 40 and 75 grains.


    1:7" Twist Rate
    Beginning in 2007 Savage started offering the faster 1:7" twist rate as an option in the Model 12 LRPV and the Model 10 Predator Hunter. 2007 was the only year for the faster twist in the Predator Hunter.

    In 2008 the 1:7" twist continued in the Model 12LRPV and also became an option in the Model 12 VLP.

    In 2010 the Model 12 F/TR became available with the 1:7" twist rate option.

    The faster 1:7" twist also became available in the Model 11 Lightweight Hunter in 2011.

    Starting in 2012 Savage expanded the 1:7" twist option to include the Model 12 BVSS and the Model 12 BTCSS. This was the only year either of these models were offered with the faster twist.

    As of the 2015 Savage Arms catalog, only the Model 12 VLP, Model 12 LRPV and the Model 12 F/TR are still being offered with the 1:7" twist rate option.

    Per the 2018 Savage Arms catalog, the Model 12 VLP, 12 LRPV and 12 F/TR are the only three models offered with the 1-7" twist rate.


    1:8" Twist Rate
    When Savage entered into the AR-15 market with their new line of MSR15 rifles in 2017, they did so with a 1-8" twist rate for all rifles chambered in .223 Remignton / 5.56 NATO.





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